The article compares two strategic frameworks commonly used in organizational development: SWOT and SOAR analysis.

SWOT analysis evaluates a company’s internal and external factors, including strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. SOAR analysis focuses on positive elements and accountability, and assesses a company’s strengths and opportunities, replacing weaknesses and threats with aspirations and results.

SOAR is a forward-thinking and action-oriented approach, and is more easily integrated throughout an organization than SWOT. The specific needs and goals of the organization determine which tool is more suitable. SOAR analysis is a valuable alternative to SWOT for companies looking to grow and succeed.

Comparing SOAR and SWOT: Which Method is Right for Your Business?

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Thaisa Fernandes

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In this article, Chandra Shekhar discusses the importance of user stories in the Agile development process and how they can be used to spark conversations within a team to better understand the end user.

User stories should be used as conversation starters rather than a means to simply communicate requirements. Chandra suggests that the team should focus on the interactions of the feature and draft out the “why” and “how” before filling up the backlog.

Chandra also suggest using tools like user personas and user flows to better understand the user and the team should brainstorm and collect feedback on how to implement the idea. The goal is to have clear user flows, user personas, clear context about “why” and “how”, acceptance criteria, and team buy-in.

Crafting a Perfect User Story

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Thaisa Fernandes

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Decolonization in design aims to challenge the narrow Western-centric view of what’s considered “good” design. It recognizes the impact of colonization and oppression on society and design, and promotes diversity and inclusiveness by embracing different cultural perspectives.

Decolonization means recognizing the power of design choices, which have the potential to include or exclude certain groups, and it requires a closer look at the history and context behind these choices.

The decolonization movement is about rethinking our perspective on design, recognizing its political nature and embracing a more diverse and inclusive view of design.

Decolonizing Design: An Exploration of Culture, Power, and Oppression

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Thaisa Fernandes

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Thaisa Fernandes

Product Management & Global Partnerships | Host @ Latinx in Power Podcast | Book Co-Author @ Mulheres de Produto